A Writer's Playground

Monthly Activities for Kids by Linda Martin Andersen

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Archive for March, 2013

Don’t Let April Showers Rain on Your Parade

Posted by lindamartinandersen on March 31, 2013


“Don’t Let April Showers Rain on Your Parade” by Linda Martin Andersen

“A Writer’s Playground”

A place to find wordplay, writing, and monthly calendar activities for kids and those young at heart.

Think:  What does the word “April” bring to mind? Expressions like:  “April showers bring May flowers,” or “Don’t rain on my parade?”  What does this mean? 

Other things we remember in April include:  April Fool’s jokes. Rain showers.  Puddles.  Umbrellas.  Galoshes.  Check the list below for far more things to celebrate in April.

Special Days in April:

Oh my, have you heard? 

  • April 3 is Pony Express Day and on that day the Pony Express replaces postal delivery. 
  • April 29 is Save the Frogs Day.  Sign up now to adopt a frog and save it from the frying pan.

APRIL FOOL!  These two events are true celebrations, but the way I stated that it would be celebrated is all a big fat fib.  Did I fool you?  Probably not.  Who have you fooled today?  Tell how.  As you may have guessed, April Fool’s Day is a favorite.  Create an original joke of your own.  What common ones have you heard? 

  • International Children’s Book Day:  2  Read a book about another country, a child from another country, a dog breed that contains a town or country such as:  Boston Pug, Chinese Pug, German Shepherd, etc. 
  • Metric System Day:  7  Work some math problems and answer using metric measurements.  Did you know that hospital patients are weighed in bed?  Can you convert measurements to metric?
  • National Sibling Day:  10  If you have a sibling, make a card for this person and  tell how he/she is special to you.
  • Safety Pin Day:  10  Where do you see them?  Who gives them away?  How have you used one?  What craft projects have you made using safety pins?
  • Scrabble Day:  13  Have you ever played?  Will you play today?
  • Blah! Blah! Blah! Day:  17  When was this first said?  Why?  What does it mean to you?  It always reminds me of the intercom on the Peanuts cartoon programs. 
  • Ellis Island Family History Day:  17.  Does your family have anyone who entered America through Ellis Island?  Ask to hear stories.
  •  National Haiku Poetry Day:  17  Research how to write a haiku.  Write one about spring, April, or something celebrated this month.
  • Poem in Your Pocket Day:  18  Do you have a favorite poem?  Copy it and carry it in your pocket.  Ask your friends to do the same.  Share poems when you see each other. 
  • Movie Theatre Day:  23  What’s a favorite movie memory? 
  • Richter Scale Day:  26.  Research this scale.  What does it measure.  Tell of a famous disaster measured by the Richter Scale.
  • Babe Ruth:  27.  Do you know this name?  Why is he famous?
  • Zipper Day:  29  When were zippers invented?  Who is Jughead and what does he wear zipped?  What do you own that zips?  Read My Last Best Friend by Julie Bowe and learn how zippers can become a story character. 

Special Weeks in April:

  • Golden Rule Week:  1-7  What is the Golden Rule?  What does it mean?  What books talk about this theme?
  • International Whistlers Week:  17-21  I hope you’ll take time to read an earlier blog post about Phyllis Heil at  https://lindamartinandersen.wordpress.com/2012/06/08/a-writers-playground-welcomes-phyllis-heil-the-whistling-woman-and-offers-a-cd-giveaway/  The giveaway is no longer available, but Phyllis plans to be at this year’s festival.
  • National Volunteer Week:  21-27.  Name a volunteer you know.  What type volunteer work would you like to do?  Walk dogs at the kennel, pick up roadside trash, help in the food bank, etc.  Ask your parents if you can try it.  Perhaps a parent would volunteer with you.
  • National Playground Safety Week:  21-27  Is the playground equipment inspected regularly in your area?  How do you know?  Do you know anyone who has been hurt on the playground?  Was it a safety issue?
  • National Dance Week:  26–5/4  Are you a dancer?  Survey your friends to learn who has taken dance class. 

April is…

  • National Child Abuse Prevention Month  What can be done to help prevent child abuse?
  • Jazz Appreciation Month  Do you have a favorite jazz musician?  Do you listen to jazz?  Research to learn more about the history of jazz.  Fine a picture book about jazz.
  • Keep America Beautiful  An old promotion poster read:  Give a hoot, don’t pollute.  What message would you like to promote about this topic?
  • National Kite Month  What is your favorite kite design?  Fly one this month if you can.
  • School Library Media Month  Give a cheer for school librarians!

*Thank you Brownie Locks.com for April celebration information.  For more April observances check out:  http://www.brownielocks.com/april.html

Thank you for visiting “A Writer’s Playground.” Please come again soon.  Bring a friend. 

Coming soon:  Pat Strobel, a School Librarian, shares about School Library Media Month.

Copyright © 2013 Linda Martin Andersen

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Posted in Calendar Events, Careers, Character Traits, Games, Interviews, Math, Monthly Activities, Reading, Science, Social Studies, Uncategorized, Writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 15 Comments »

Another Giveaway Winner: What Does Tuberculosis Have to Do With The Ballad of Jessie Pearl? Ask Shannon Hitchcock.

Posted by lindamartinandersen on March 29, 2013


“Another Giveaway Winner:  What Does Tuberculosis Have to Do With The Ballad of Jessie Pearl?  Ask Shannon Hitchcock.” by Linda Martin Andersen

“A Writer’s Playground”–A place to find wordplay, writing, and monthly calendar activities for kids and those young at heart.

I’m reprinting this post for those who may have missed it and announcing the winner of an advanced reader’s copy (ARC) of The Ballad of Jessie Pearl by Shannon Hitchcock. 

And the winner is: 

Tracy Campbell.  Congratulations.  Please email me your address and I will pass it on to Shannon.  I know you’ll enjoy this great book.  Thanks for entering.  And thanks to all the other readers who entered or commented.

It’s Tuberculosis Day–March 24, 2013. 

Meet Shannon Hitchcock, a children’s author who writes about tuberculosis in her debut novel The Ballad of Jessie Pearl.

shannonsmx[1]jessiepearl2x[1]

Visit Shannon Hitchcock’s website at: http://www.shannonhitchcock.com/

Join me in providing a warm welcome for Shannon Hitchcock.

*Applause.*

World Tuberculosis Day and THE BALLAD OF JESSIE PEARL 

World Tuberculosis Day is March 24th and to commemorate that day, I’m answering questions about the disease and my novel, THE BALLAD OF JESSIE PEARL.  I’m also offering a giveaway:  An Advanced Readers Copy (ARC) of my novel (paperback).

Here’s a brief synopsis of THE BALLAD OF JESSIE PEARL: It’s 1922, and Jessie has big plans for her future, but that’s before tuberculosis strikes. Though she has no talent for cooking, cleaning, or nursing, Jessie puts her dreams on hold to help her family. She falls in love for the first time ever, and suddenly what she wants is not so simple anymore.  You can get a real flavor for the novel by watching the book trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRXyeIJ4js8

Why did you write a novel about tuberculosis? I didn’t exactly choose tuberculosis, it chose me, or more accurately it chose my family. In 1922, one of my grandmother’s sisters died from tuberculosis. Crawley was twenty years old. She left behind a ten-month-old baby and a letter planning her own funeral. That bit of family history captured my imagination and inspired my book.

Where does your novel take place? In my hometown of East Bend, North Carolina. Speaking of which, North Carolina has an interesting history with TB sufferers. The state’s fresh mountain air was considered optimal for treating lung disease. Asheville attracted so many sufferers that a pamphlet published in 1915 by the U.S. Public Health Service declared North Carolina to have the largest number of tuberculosis patients in the world.

What exactly is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by a bacterium called mycobacterium tuberculosis. It’s spread through the air when infected people cough and spit. A great TB overview can be found at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/basics/default.htm

What are the symptoms of the disease? Severe weight loss, a ghostly pale complexion, a hacking cough, blood-tinged phlegm, joint pain, diarrhea, and swollen legs.

Is there a vaccine to prevent tuberculosis? Yes, it’s called Bacille Calmette-Guerin, or BCG. However the vaccine is not widely used in the United States and it doesn’t prevent all types of TB. That’s why doctors ask sick patients if they’ve been exposed to tuberculosis or traveled to parts of the world where TB is prevalent.

How do doctors test for TB? Most often doctors use a TB skin test. With a small needle they inject a testing material called tuberculin under the skin. Two to three days later, they check to see if there is a reaction to the injection. Other tests include a blood test, a chest x-ray, and collecting a sample of sputum or phlegm that is coughed up from the lungs.

Is there a cure for tuberculosis? Yes, the first drug used to treat TB was streptomycin, but doctors soon discovered that it’s more effective to treat the disease with multiple drugs. The current four-drug regimen includes isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutal or streptomycin. You can learn more about the treatment here: http://www.umdnj.edu/ntbcweb/tbhistory.htm.

If there is a cure, why did your family suffer from tuberculosis? Medicine to treat the disease was not readily available until after the end of World War II. During the 1920’s, when my book is set, infected people had two options: rest at home and be cared for by family members, or go away for treatment in a sanatorium.

What is a sanatorium? A sanatorium is a special hospital to isolate people infected with tuberculosis. By 1925, there were more than five hundred sanatoriums with almost seven hundred thousand beds in the United States alone. In a sanatorium, patients were treated with good food, plenty of rest, and fresh air. Many even slept outside on covered porches.

Do we still have sanatoriums? Not in the United States. The last freestanding sanatorium, located in Lantana, Florida, was closed in 2012. You can read more about the hospital here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/13/health/13tuberculosis.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Is tuberculosis still a problem today? Yes! About one-and-a-half million people still die from tuberculosis each year. It remains an epidemic in much of the world, mainly in poorer countries. Another sobering fact is the development of multi-drug resistant strains of TB.

Where can I learn more about tuberculosis? One of my favorite non-fiction books about the disease is INVINCIBLE MICROBE: TUBERCULOSIS AND THE NEVER-ENDING SEARCH FOR A CURE by Jim Murphy and Alison Blank. (Clarion, 2012)

The School Library Journal says of the book, “Starting with the dramatic cover photo of a row of girls lying in their hospital beds, Murphy and Blank unwind the tangled history of tuberculosis, a disease that continues to kill millions every year…Readers will be surprised to learn that kings believed that a single touch of their hand would cure the peasants and that one of the more radical treatments for TB included removing multiple ribs from a patient’s chest. At times gruesome and somewhat somnolent when describing the peaceful sanatoriums, the book clearly details all the many unsuccessful attempts to cure this infectious disease.”

Another interesting resource is the diary of Fanny W. Midgett, who recorded her stay at Cragmont Sanatorium in North Carolina. http://www.ncgenweb.us/dare/miscellany/midgettfanniediary.html

What are you writing about now? Yet another novel. CAROLINA GIRLS is set in 1969 and also based on a family story. It’s about an accident, but touches on integration of the public school system and the first moonwalk.

Shannon Hitchcock has generously offered a giveaway–an Advanced Readers Copy (ARC) of The Ballad of Jessie Pearl to one lucky person.  Leave a comment or question with your email address (to contact winner) by March 28, 2013 and you’re entered.  The winner will be announced March 29, 2013.

Thanks for visiting “A Writer’s Playground.”  Please come again soon and bring a friend.

Copyright © 2013 Linda Martin Andersen

Posted in Careers, Character Traits, Interviews, Monthly Activities, Reading, Writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

Another Giveaway: What Does Tuberculosis Have to Do With The Ballad of Jessie Pearl? Ask Shannon Hitchcock.

Posted by lindamartinandersen on March 23, 2013


“Another Giveaway:  What Does Tuberculosis Have to Do With The Ballad of Jessie Pearl?  Ask Shannon Hitchcock.” by Linda Martin Andersen

“A Writer’s Playground”–A place to find wordplay, writing, and monthly calendar activities for kids and those young at heart.

It’s Tuberculosis Day–March 24, 2013. 

Meet Shannon Hitchcock, a children’s author who writes about tuberculosis in her debut novel The Ballad of Jessie Pearl.

shannonsmx[1]jessiepearl2x[1]

Visit Shannon Hitchcock’s website at: http://www.shannonhitchcock.com/

Join me in providing a warm welcome for Shannon Hitchcock.

*Applause.*

World Tuberculosis Day and THE BALLAD OF JESSIE PEARL 

World Tuberculosis Day is March 24th and to commemorate that day, I’m answering questions about the disease and my novel, THE BALLAD OF JESSIE PEARL.  I’m also offering a giveaway:  An Advanced Readers Copy (ARC) of my novel (paperback).

Here’s a brief synopsis of THE BALLAD OF JESSIE PEARL: It’s 1922, and Jessie has big plans for her future, but that’s before tuberculosis strikes. Though she has no talent for cooking, cleaning, or nursing, Jessie puts her dreams on hold to help her family. She falls in love for the first time ever, and suddenly what she wants is not so simple anymore.  You can get a real flavor for the novel by watching the book trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRXyeIJ4js8

Why did you write a novel about tuberculosis? I didn’t exactly choose tuberculosis, it chose me, or more accurately it chose my family. In 1922, one of my grandmother’s sisters died from tuberculosis. Crawley was twenty years old. She left behind a ten-month-old baby and a letter planning her own funeral. That bit of family history captured my imagination and inspired my book.

Where does your novel take place? In my hometown of East Bend, North Carolina. Speaking of which, North Carolina has an interesting history with TB sufferers. The state’s fresh mountain air was considered optimal for treating lung disease. Asheville attracted so many sufferers that a pamphlet published in 1915 by the U.S. Public Health Service declared North Carolina to have the largest number of tuberculosis patients in the world.

What exactly is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by a bacterium called mycobacterium tuberculosis. It’s spread through the air when infected people cough and spit. A great TB overview can be found at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/tb/topic/basics/default.htm

What are the symptoms of the disease? Severe weight loss, a ghostly pale complexion, a hacking cough, blood-tinged phlegm, joint pain, diarrhea, and swollen legs.

Is there a vaccine to prevent tuberculosis? Yes, it’s called Bacille Calmette-Guerin, or BCG. However the vaccine is not widely used in the United States and it doesn’t prevent all types of TB. That’s why doctors ask sick patients if they’ve been exposed to tuberculosis or traveled to parts of the world where TB is prevalent.

How do doctors test for TB? Most often doctors use a TB skin test. With a small needle they inject a testing material called tuberculin under the skin. Two to three days later, they check to see if there is a reaction to the injection. Other tests include a blood test, a chest x-ray, and collecting a sample of sputum or phlegm that is coughed up from the lungs.

Is there a cure for tuberculosis? Yes, the first drug used to treat TB was streptomycin, but doctors soon discovered that it’s more effective to treat the disease with multiple drugs. The current four-drug regimen includes isoniazid, rifampin, pyrazinamide, and ethambutal or streptomycin. You can learn more about the treatment here: http://www.umdnj.edu/ntbcweb/tbhistory.htm.

If there is a cure, why did your family suffer from tuberculosis? Medicine to treat the disease was not readily available until after the end of World War II. During the 1920’s, when my book is set, infected people had two options: rest at home and be cared for by family members, or go away for treatment in a sanatorium.

What is a sanatorium? A sanatorium is a special hospital to isolate people infected with tuberculosis. By 1925, there were more than five hundred sanatoriums with almost seven hundred thousand beds in the United States alone. In a sanatorium, patients were treated with good food, plenty of rest, and fresh air. Many even slept outside on covered porches.

Do we still have sanatoriums? Not in the United States. The last freestanding sanatorium, located in Lantana, Florida, was closed in 2012. You can read more about the hospital here: http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/13/health/13tuberculosis.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Is tuberculosis still a problem today? Yes! About one-and-a-half million people still die from tuberculosis each year. It remains an epidemic in much of the world, mainly in poorer countries. Another sobering fact is the development of multi-drug resistant strains of TB.

Where can I learn more about tuberculosis? One of my favorite non-fiction books about the disease is INVINCIBLE MICROBE: TUBERCULOSIS AND THE NEVER-ENDING SEARCH FOR A CURE by Jim Murphy and Alison Blank. (Clarion, 2012)

The School Library Journal says of the book, “Starting with the dramatic cover photo of a row of girls lying in their hospital beds, Murphy and Blank unwind the tangled history of tuberculosis, a disease that continues to kill millions every year…Readers will be surprised to learn that kings believed that a single touch of their hand would cure the peasants and that one of the more radical treatments for TB included removing multiple ribs from a patient’s chest. At times gruesome and somewhat somnolent when describing the peaceful sanatoriums, the book clearly details all the many unsuccessful attempts to cure this infectious disease.”

Another interesting resource is the diary of Fanny W. Midgett, who recorded her stay at Cragmont Sanatorium in North Carolina. http://www.ncgenweb.us/dare/miscellany/midgettfanniediary.html

What are you writing about now? Yet another novel. CAROLINA GIRLS is set in 1969 and also based on a family story. It’s about an accident, but touches on integration of the public school system and the first moonwalk.

Shannon Hitchcock has generously offered a giveaway–an Advanced Readers Copy (ARC) of The Ballad of Jessie Pearl to one lucky person.  Leave a comment or question with your email address (to contact winner) by March 28, 2013 and you’re entered.  The winner will be announced March 29, 2013.

Thanks for visiting “A Writer’s Playground.”  Please come again soon and bring a friend.

Copyright © 2013 Linda Martin Andersen

Posted in Careers, Character Traits, Interviews, Monthly Activities, Reading, Writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 28 Comments »

Quilting–It’s an Art

Posted by lindamartinandersen on March 14, 2013


“Quilting–It’s an Art” by Linda Martin Andersen

“A Writer’s Playground”–A place to find wordplay, writing, and monthly calendar activities for kids and those young at heart.

National Quilting Day is March 16, 2013.

To celebrate, Maureen Wartski has agreed to be our guest blogger.  Maureen is a talented children’s author, storyteller, watercolor artist, and quilt artist.  

Join me in providing a warm welcome for Maureen Wartski.

003 (2)

*Applause*

Hi, Linda, I’m delighted to be with you on your Quilt Day blog. Quilts have been special to my life, and I have always admired the expertise and precision with which my fellow quilters construct their beautiful work.

Did you know that the word ‘quilt’ comes from the Latin culcita which means—literally—a stuffed sack? Hardly a romantic start—but then, quilts have been around for a while. An ivory figure of an Egyptian First Dynasty pharaoh sported a quilted garment around 3400 BCE, quilted garments have been unearthed in Mongolia, and medieval knights wore them under their armor. The earliest surviving quilt comes from 14th century Sicily and is in the Victoria and AlbertMuseum in London.

Quilts as we know them today, were popular in the 19th century, and the art followed settlers to the new world. Quilting bees became popular when women in the vast and isolating Great Plains found a way to get together with their neighbors, and that practice continues, happily, to this day. The “Jewel Box Bee” of which I am a member, meets each Thursday to schmooze and to work on our projects. Some of us are traditional quilters; some combine abstract design with traditional elements, some design their own quilt ‘blocks,’ and others are accomplished in appliqué. For myself, I enjoy art quilting.

Art quilts come in so many forms that they defy definition. You have only to research ‘art quilts’ on the web and a thousand wonderful designs will appear. Personally, I like my wall-hangings and quilts to tell a story. This comes naturally, I think, because I have been a writer for more than 50 years and story-telling is in my DNA. Oddly enough, I have only written once about quilting in “String Piecing With Ben” an article written for Quilt Life, in their February 2013 issue.

"Come and Play" by Maureen Wartski
“Come and Play” by Maureen Wartski

My methods for constructing art quilts vary. Sometimes—not often, but sometimes—I have a clear idea of what I am going to do, and I follow the idea carefully. More often, I toss an interesting piece of fabric on the floor, stare at it for a while, mutter to myself, and then fling more fabrics onto the first. Then from some dark recesses of my brain a thought appears… and I am off and running! When this happens I will sometimes glue or fuse bits of fabric onto a background, cover all with a piece of tulle, then machine quilt. You can see the result in “Come And Play.” Perhaps you can even imagine a story!

The Natural world is an important component both in my quilts and in my writing.

"Going Up" by Maureen Wartski
“Going Up” by Maureen Wartski

                                                                                             yuri_cover_web[1]

Yuri’s Brush With Magic has the sea as its background. In this book sea turtles are key, while  “Going Up” is all about a frog trying to climb a plant! Then there are the all important elements of light and color. In two quilts, “Solitude” and“It’s Spring!” there is light—but such a different light! One quilt is exuberant with renewal and joy… the other speaks of silence and contemplation. Such stories these quilts told me as I worked on them!

I hope that you, too, will be tempted to pick up fabric, needle and thread. Fabric is a wonderful medium, flexible, alive, and so marvelously suited to express an idea or tell a story.

"Solitude" by Maureen Wartski
“Solitude” by Maureen Wartski
"It's Spring!" by Maureen Wartski
“It’s Spring!” by Maureen Wartski

Imagination

Awaits a new found story

In this bolt of cloth.

                   by Maureen Wartski

Maureen, thanks so much for being our guest blogger!  If you would like to ask Maureen questions or make comments, please do.

Maureen’s art quilts can be seen on her website at:

http://www.maureenwartski.com/index.htm

on Fine Art America at:  http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/maureen-wartski.html?page=3

and on Etsy at http://www.etsy.com/shop/fabricartbymaureen

Visit her blog at:  http://maureenwartski.wordpress.com/

Thanks for visiting “A Writer’s Playground.”  Come again soon.  Bring a friend.

Copyright © 2013 Linda Martin Andersen

Posted in Careers, Character Traits, Interviews, Monthly Activities, Reading, Writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

It’s Not Fair

Posted by lindamartinandersen on March 8, 2013


“It’s Not Fair” by Linda Martin Andersen

 

Welcome to “A Writer’s Playground”–A place to find wordplay, writing, and monthly calendar activities for kids and those young at heart.

When I was an elementary School Counselor in Cumberland County, NC, students studied character traits each month. Through blog posts at “A Writer’s Playground,” I continue to spread the word about good character. 

This month, like the Cumberland County Schools in Fayetteville, NC, I present the character trait of FAIRNESS, defined as “playing by the rules, taking turns, sharing and listening.”  To promote this trait, I selected a delightful picture book written by Darcy Pattison and illustrated by Steven Salerno.  It’s entitled 19 Girls and Me.

19GirlsandMe300x200Darcy250x250

When you think of fairness, a nagging saying probably echoes in your mind:  “It’s not fair.”  Children say it.  Adults probably think it, but most won’t admit they do.  Here are some children’s books titles that include this expression:  It’s Not Fair by Charlotte Zolotow, It’s Not Fair!  by Anita Harper and It’s Not Fair! by Amy Krouse Rosenthal & Tom Lichtenheld.  Check these books out for more on this saying.

This month I chose to spotlight a book about fairness that does not include the words “it’s not fair.”  In 19 Girls and Me, Darcy’s Pattison’s main character, John Hercules Po, is assigned to a kindergarten classroom full of girls.   John Hercules Po’s older brother tells him that the girls will turn him into a sissy, but John has a different plan.

19 Girls and Me is delightful.  It isn’t predictable.  The children’s imaginations are at play.  The end result is a win, win, situation.

Adults, the next time you hear someone say, “That’s not fair,” I hope you’ll remember to pull a copy of this book from a shelf and read how John Hercules Po and the 19 girls in his classroom chose to  handle their “unfair” situation in a positive way.   19 Girls and Me becomes an interactive reading by encouraging listeners to act out the scenes as they are read.  The audience can also call “Lunch” when it’s time.

Ask students to identify their favorite day of the week from the story.  Ask what happened that day on the playground?  Name something that surprised you in the story.  How did you expect the story to end?  How did John describe his classmates at the end of the book?  How do you feel about that?

Girls, have you ever been called a tomboy?  Boys, have you ever been called a sissy?  What do those words mean?  I’ve heard these called “fighting words.”  What do you think that means?  

If you’re a children’s author, I recommend checking out Darcy Pattison’s blog and upcoming novel revision retreats.  http://www.darcypattison.com/

March 24-30 is Tsunami Awareness Week–

and in observance of this, I’d like to suggest checking out another title by Darcy Pattison: Wisdom, the Midway Albatross, the oldest known bird in the world and one that has survived tsunamis and other natural disasters. 

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http://www.darcypattison.com/dpbooks/wisdom-the-midway-albatross/

Check for other books by Darcy Pattison at her website.

Thank you for joining us at “A Writer’s Playground.”  Come again soon and bring a friend.

Copyright © 2013 Linda Martin Andersen

Posted in Careers, Character Traits, Games, Interviews, Math, Monthly Activities, Reading, Science, Social Studies, Uncategorized, Writing | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments »

Hula-Hoop History

Posted by lindamartinandersen on March 5, 2013


“Hula-Hoop History” by Linda Martin Andersen

“A Writer’s Playground”–A place to find wordplay, writing, and monthly calendar activities for kids and those young at heart.

Hula-Hoop History…read all about it.

Joyce Hostetter, a historical novel author and friend, introduced me to www.history.com.  If you haven’t checked it out, today’s an extra fun day to do so.   I subscribe to their e-newsletter that spotlights things that happened this day in history.  Today’s news headline caught my attention.  I hope it catches yours too.   Hula-Hoop–give it a whirl, at home, on the playground, even at work.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/hula-hoop-patented?et_cid=52274078&et_rid=724205536&linkid=http%3a%2f%2fwww.history.com%2fthis-day-in-history%2fhula-hoop-patented

Thanks to Wham-O, who brought us all the Hula-Hoop.  Please share your favorite Hula-Hoop story or other comments.  What other famous toy did Wham-O develop?  Read to see.  Just for fun, how many hyphens do you see here?

Thanks for visiting “A Writer’s Playground.”  Come again soon.  Bring a friend.

Copyright © 2013 Linda Martin Andersen

Posted in Careers, Character Traits, Interviews, Monthly Activities, Reading, Writing | Tagged: , , , , , | 10 Comments »

 
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